max

Tuesday

How to Replace Starter on Ford?

The ford starter removal procedure is as follows:----


Starter
REMOVAL & INSTALLATION
TESTING & TROUBLESHOOTING
 Instructions are as follows: ----

Removal & Installation



  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Raise and support the vehicle safely.
    NOTE
    When removing the hard shell connector at terminal -S-, grasp the plastic shell. Do not pull on the wire.
  3. Disconnect the starter electrical harness.
  4. Remove the upper starter bolt.
  5. Support the starter and remove the lower bolt.
  6. Remove the starter from the vehicle.

    Click image to see an enlarged view
    Fig. The starter is located at the lower front of the engine, and is visible through the air duct
To install:
  1. Position the starter in the vehicle.
  2. Install the upper and lower bolts. Tighten to 15-20 ft. lbs. (20-27 Nm).
  3. Connect the starter electrical harness. Tighten the starter cable nut to 80-124 inch lbs. (9-14 Nm).
    NOTE
    When installing the hard shell connector, be careful to push it straight on and make sure it locks in position with a notable click or detent.
  4. Lower the vehicle.
  5. Connect the negative battery cable.

Testing & Troubleshooting




CAUTION
When servicing the starter motor or performing other underhood work in the vicinity of the starter motor, be aware that the heavy gauge battery input lead at the starter solenoid is "electrically hot" at all times.


WARNING
A protective cap or boot is provided over the battery input terminal on all vehicle lines and must be replaced after repair. Be sure to disconnect the battery ground cable before replacing the starter motor.


NOTE
Always make the 73 Digital Multimeter connections at the component terminal rather than at the wiring end connector. Making a connection at the wiring end connector could result in false readings because the meter will not pick up a high resistance between the wiring connector and the component.

Feed Circuit Test

NOTE
Make all multimeter connections at the component terminal rather than the cable or wiring terminal.

  1. Make sure the battery is fully charged. Perform a battery load test.
  2. Disconnect the ignition coil connector.
  3. Connect a remote starter switch between the starter solenoid S-terminal and the battery positive post.
  4. Connect the positive lead of digital multimeter to the battery positive post. Connect the negative lead of the multimeter to the starter solenoid M-terminal.
  5. Engage the remote starter switch. Read and record the voltage. The multimeter reading should be 0.5 volt or less.
  6. If the voltage reading is 0.5 volt or less, go to the Starter Motor - Ground Circuit Component Test
  7. If the voltage reading is greater than 0.5 volt, this is an indication of excessive resistance in the connections, the positive battery cable or in the starter solenoid. Move the digital multimeter negative lead to the starter solenoid B-terminal and repeat the test. If the voltage reading at the B-terminal is lower than 0.5 volts, the concern is either in the connections at the starter solenoid or in the solenoid contacts.
  8. Remove the cables at the starter solenoid B-, S-, and M-terminals. Clean the connections and install the cables. If the reading is still higher than 0.5 volt at the M-terminal and 0.5 volt or lower at the B-terminal, the concern is the solenoid contacts. Install a new starter motor.
  9. If the voltage measured in Step 5 is greater than 0.5 volt, the concern is either the positive battery cable connection or the positive battery cable itself. Clean the positive battery cable connection. If this does not solve the problem, replace the positive battery cable.
Ground Circuit Test

NOTE
Make all multimeter connections at the component terminal rather than the cable or wiring terminal.

  1. Disconnect the ignition coil connector.
  2. Connect a remote starter switch between the starter solenoid S-terminal and the battery positive terminal.
  3. Connect the positive lead of digital multimeter to the starter motor housing. The connection must be clean and free of rust or grease. Connect the negative lead to the negative battery terminal.
  4. Engage the remote starter switch and read the voltage. The reading should be 0.2 volt or less.
  5. If the voltage drop is greater than 0.2 volt, clean the negative battery cable connections at the battery, the body ground connections, and the starter ground connections. Retest.
  6. If the voltage is still more than 0.2 volt, install a new cable. If the reading is less than 0.2 volt and the engine still cranks slowly, install a new starter motor.
Voltage Drop Test
  1. Make sure the battery is fully charged.
  2. Disconnect the inertia fuel shutoff (IFS) switch.
  3. Connect a remote starter switch between the starter solenoid S terminal and the battery positive (+) terminal.
  4. Connect the 73 Digital Multimeter positive lead to the battery positive (+) post. Connect the negative lead to the starter solenoid M terminal.
  5. Engage the remote starter switch. Read and record the voltage. The voltage reading should be 0.5 volts or less.
  6. If the voltage reading is 0.5 volts or less, go to the Ground Circuit Component Test.
  7. If the voltage reading is greater than 0.5 volts, indicating excessive resistance, move the 73 Digital Multimeter negative lead to the starter solenoid B terminal and repeat the test. If the voltage reading at the B terminal is lower than 0.5 volts, the concern is either in the connections at the starter solenoid or in the solenoid contacts.
  8. Remove the cables from solenoid B, S and M terminals. Clean the cables and connections and reinstall the cables to the proper terminals. Repeat Steps 3 through 6. If the voltage drop reading is still greater than 0.5 volts when checked at the M terminal or less than 0.5 volts when checked at the B terminal, the concern is in the solenoid contacts. Replace the starter motor.
  9. If the voltage reading taken at the solenoid B terminal is still greater than 0.5 volts after cleaning the cables and connections at the solenoid, the concern is either in the positive (+) battery cable connection or in the positive battery cable.
  10. By moving the 73 Digital Multimeter negative lead toward the battery and checking each mechanical connection point, the excessive voltage drop can be located. When the high reading disappears, the last mechanical point that was checked is the concern. Repair or replace this connection as required.

This will help.
Thanks.

FOR MORE HELP GO TO: ---

Car repair guide?

http://technoanswers.blogspot.in/2012/03/car-repair-guide.html



No comments:

Post a Comment